Whether you’re new to veganism, have been vegan for a while or are taking a flexible approach to consuming a plant-based diet, one nutrient that you might be wondering about is protein.

All too often, protein is associated with meat and animal products and while there’s no doubt that they contain this essential nutrient, that’s not to say that plants don’t also have everything we need on this front.

For those who regularly exercise, consuming enough protein in your diet is essential, as an article for Runner’s World recently explained. The publication went on to offer some tips on where to get a good hit of protein in a vegan diet.

It explained that protein, along with fibre, is one of the most important nutrients in helping you feel full after you’ve eaten.

Sarah Schlichter told the news provider that it’s particularly important to make sure you’ve got protein in any post-workout meal. “Including protein in a snack or post-workout meal can also help with fullness, as protein is more saiting and takes longer to digest than a carbohydrate-based snack alone,” she asserted.

With that in mind, what kinds of things should you be reaching for when you’ve finished your exercise for the day?

Tofu is often one of the go-to options for vegetarians and vegans alike and with good reason, as a three ounce serving of tofu contains nine grams of plant-based protein. This particular food stuff has another benefit in that it also contains iron and calcium.

Peas are also surprisingly high in protein, containing four grams of protein per half cup. These are a versatile vegetable that it’s easy to include in many dishes.

If you’re looking for organic protein powder in the UK, you could also consider investing in some pea protein to help provide the boost you need to your smoothies or shakes. In fact, the Runner’s World article suggested that a plant-based smoothie that includes protein powder could be the ideal choice after a run or training session.

For many people, it is much easier to drink something than eat straight after exercise, and if you prepare your smoothie before you go out for your run, it’ll be ready and waiting when you get home, removing the temptation to snack on less healthy options while you cook a meal.

Lentils are another great source of plant-based protein, the news provider added, with half a cup providing nine grams of protein and 30 per cent of your daily fibre.

If you’re new to vegan protein powders and are a little overwhelmed by all of the options, take a look at our handy blog about the various products on the market. One thing to bear in mind is that pea protein tends to be one of the cheapest options out there, and as it’s relatively tasteless it’s a good addition to most smoothies, shakes or meals.

Other protein powders to consider include hemp, which is known for the nine essential amino acids it contains, or pumpkin seed protein, which offers a vegan source of omega fatty acids, as well as protein of course.